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Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
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  • Bone Densitometry in Transgender Individuals

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this lecture, Harold Rosen MD, CCD, presents his cutting-edge research on the topic of bone densitometry in transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) individuals. He provides insight into the correct terminology one must use when speaking about these individuals, discusses ways to appropriately screen and diagnose transgender individuals, and reviews guidelines for treatment in the most recent literature on the topic. This lecture is an excellent companion to the article titled "Bone Densitometry in Transgender and Gender Nonconforming (TGNC) Individuals: The 2019 ISCD Official Positions," also featured on the ISCD Learning Center.

    1. Utilize the correct terminology associated with treating transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) individuals.
    2. Summarize ways to appropriately screen and diagnose transgender individuals using appropriate reference data.
    3. Outline key updates to the 2019 ISCD official positions and other recent literature that provides guidelines for treating TGNC individuals.
  • Challenging DXA Cases

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This lecture will discuss interesting and challenging DXA scans. Included in the presentation are problems with DXA scan analysis and challenging cases including how objects in the soft tissue affect analysis and how to do an analysis with spinal hardware present. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    This lecture will discuss interesting and challenging DXA scans. Included in the presentation are problems with DXA scan analysis and challenging cases including how objects in the soft tissue affect analysis and how to do an analysis with spinal hardware present. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting..

    Learning Objectives

    1. Identify common technical and reporting errors from scans acquired on GE Lunar instruments.
    2. Describe challenging DXA situations identified by colleagues. 
    3. List approaches to assess the technical validity of GE Lunar DXA scans. 


    Sarah L. Morgan, MD, RD, CCD

    Professor, Medical Director UAB Osteoporosis Clinic and DXA Facility

    University of Alabama at Birmingham

    Dr. Morgan is the Medical Director of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Osteoporosis Prevention and Treatment Clinic and the UAB Bone Densitometry (DXA) Service. The UAB DXA service is accredited by the International Society for Clinical Densitometry. She received degrees in Food and Nutrition and Dietetics and Food and Nutrition and Related Sciences at Iowa State University and completed medical school and an internal medicine internship and residency at the University of Iowa. She completed a Clinical Nutrition fellowship and a master’s degree in Clinical Nutrition at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She currently is a Professor of Medicine and Nutrition Sciences in the Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology. Dr. Morgan’s research interests are in the areas of folate and methotrexate metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis and bone densitometry and she participates in osteoporosis and DXA clinical trials in the UAB Osteoporosis Clinic. Dr. Morgan is s past President of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry and a past chair of the ISCD Education Council.

  • Osteoporosis in Special Populations: Rheumatic Diseases

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Rheumatic diseases have the greatest impact on the musculoskeletal system and osteoporosis is a common and significant co-morbidity. In this talk I will briefly review skeletal manifestations of rheumatic diseases, with a special emphasis on osteoporosis and its prevention and management in patients with rheumatic diseases. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Rheumatic diseases have the greatest impact on the musculoskeletal system and osteoporosis is a common and significant co-morbidity. In this talk I will briefly review skeletal manifestations of rheumatic diseases, with a special emphasis on osteoporosis and its prevention and management in patients with rheumatic diseases.. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Review skeletal manifestations of rheumatic diseases
    2. Review the epidemiology of osteoporosis in people with rheumatic diseases
    3. Review the prevention and management of osteoporosis in partients with rheumatic disease


    John J. Carey, MBBChBAO, MS

    Consultant Physician in Rheumatology and Personal Professor in Medicine

    Galway University Hospitals, Galway

  • Non-standardized Densitometry Acquisition for Research Purposes

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This didactic lecture will walk through steps to develop a research project and design novel approaches to DXA acquisition. This will include discussion regarding available technology and evaluation of various options to evaluate skeletal status.. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    This didactic lecture will walk through steps to develop a research project and design novel approaches to DXA acquisition. This will include discussion regarding available technology and evaluation of various options to evaluate skeletal status.. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Describe steps to structure a framework for research design.
    2. Compare and contrast various approaches to skeletal assessment.
    3. Understand the basic technical components of DXA that will impact non-standard acquisition methods.


    Diane Krueger, BS, CBDT

    Program Manager Osteoporosis Clinical

    UW Osteoporosis Clinic

    Diane Krueger received her Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is an ISCD-certified clinical densitometrist and a certified clinical research coordinator through the Association of Clinical Research Professionals. She has been program manager of the University of Wisconsin Osteoporosis Clinical Research Program since its inception in 1993. Ms. Krueger has extensive clinical research experience in osteoporosis and bone densitometry, having coordinated multiple industry and investigator-initiated studies. In collaboration with the UW Osteoporosis Program, she has published over 90 manuscripts and authored or presented over 200 abstracts. Her service with ISCD has included serving as Technologist Bone Densitometry Course faculty since 2006 and chairing the related Update Annual Meeting Committees. In her leadership capacity, she is currently Education Council chair and serves on the Executive Committee and Board. Additionally, she previously held several officer positions including Secretary and four Presidential seats.

  • Underperformance of Human BMD Genetic Studies

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Hundreds of genes have been identified in genome wide association studies of bone traits, but their total contribution to variation of these traits is small. This session will address the reasons why this is so. It will also inform listeners about the differences between human and model organism genetics and illustrate how genetic effects are measured. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Hundreds of genes have been identified in genome wide association studies of bone traits, but their total contribution to variation of these traits is small. This session will address the reasons why this is so. It will also inform listeners about the differences between human and model organism genetics and illustrate how genetic effects are measured. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Understand the basic concepts underlying GWAS.
    2. Appreciate the multiple bone properties assessed by biomechanical testing.
    3. Understand the importance of trait selection to genetic study design.


    Robert D. Blank, MD, PhD

    Visiting Scientist

    The Garvan Institute of Medical Research

    Robert D Blank is Professor of Medicine Emeritus at the Medical College of Wisconsin and a visiting scientist at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, Australia. He is a past president of the ISCD, a fellow of the ACP and the ASBMR, and a member of the ANZBMS, ASHG, Endocrine Society, GSA, APS, and AHA. He serves on the IOF's Council of Scientific Advisors, the boards of directors of the International Federation of Musculoskeletal Research Societies and the Asia-Pacific Fragility Fracture Alliance. He is an associate editor of Bone and a member of the editorial boards of JBMR, Osteoporosis International, Endocrinology, Translational Research, and Clinical Reviews in Bone and Mineral Metabolism.

    Dr. Blank is a physician-scientist with a laboratory research program focused on the genetic basis of bone biomechanical performance. Other research interests include the genetics of congenital vertebral malformation, best DXA practices, undertreatment of osteoporosis, and osteosclerotic disorders. He is an author of over 100 publications and has held multiple federal research grants. He served as associate director of the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Wisconsin from 2006-2013.

    Dr. Blank received undergraduate degrees from Columbia University and the University of Cambridge and his MD and PhD degrees from New York University. He completed residency at Weill-Cornell in internal medicine and did his fellowship in endocrinology in the combined Weill-Cornell and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center program. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Rockefeller University concurrently with fellowship. He began his faculty career at the Hospital for Special Surgery and Weill-Cornell College of Medicine. He moved to the University of Wisconsin in 2000 and to the Medical College of Wisconsin in 2013, retiring in 2019 on moving to Australia.

  • A Proposed Musculoskeletal Failure Scale

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Patients, doctors, and government officials routinely underestimate the impact of musculoskeletal (MSK) disease. Proper framing of the true burden of disease may improve awareness and management. A MSK failure scale is proposed. Its potential benefits, the work needed to establish it, and potential barriers to implementation are summarized. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Patients, doctors, and government officials routinely underestimate the impact of musculoskeletal (MSK) disease. Proper framing of the true burden of disease may improve awareness and management. A MSK failure scale is proposed. Its potential benefits, the work needed to establish it, and potential barriers to implementation are summarized. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Appreciate the global burden of musculoskeletal disorders.
    2. Recognize the treatment gap for osteoporotic fractures.
    3. Understand how a validated functional musculoskeletal failure scale would add value to research studies and improve awareness of its impact.


    Robert D. Blank, MD, PhD

    Visiting Scientist

    The Garvan Institute of Medical Research

    Robert D Blank is Professor of Medicine Emeritus at the Medical College of Wisconsin and a visiting scientist at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, Australia. He is a past president of the ISCD, a fellow of the ACP and the ASBMR, and a member of the ANZBMS, ASHG, Endocrine Society, GSA, APS, and AHA. He serves on the IOF's Council of Scientific Advisors, the boards of directors of the International Federation of Musculoskeletal Research Societies and the Asia-Pacific Fragility Fracture Alliance. He is an associate editor of Bone and a member of the editorial boards of JBMR, Osteoporosis International, Endocrinology, Translational Research, and Clinical Reviews in Bone and Mineral Metabolism.

    Dr. Blank is a physician-scientist with a laboratory research program focused on the genetic basis of bone biomechanical performance. Other research interests include the genetics of congenital vertebral malformation, best DXA practices, undertreatment of osteoporosis, and osteosclerotic disorders. He is an author of over 100 publications and has held multiple federal research grants. He served as associate director of the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Wisconsin from 2006-2013.

    Dr. Blank received undergraduate degrees from Columbia University and the University of Cambridge and his MD and PhD degrees from New York University. He completed residency at Weill-Cornell in internal medicine and did his fellowship in endocrinology in the combined Weill-Cornell and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center program. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Rockefeller University concurrently with fellowship. He began his faculty career at the Hospital for Special Surgery and Weill-Cornell College of Medicine. He moved to the University of Wisconsin in 2000 and to the Medical College of Wisconsin in 2013, retiring in 2019 on moving to Australia.

  • Reading Abdominal Aortic Calcification from VFA Lateral Spine Images and Its Relationship with Cardiovascular Disease and Fractures

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Abdominal aortic calcification or “AAC” is a stable marker of CVD that can be semi-quantified using images for vertebral fracture assessment. This session provides an overview of the methodology for scoring, pitfalls and tips for readers, as well as discussing the association between AAC with CVD and fractures and the potential for patient management. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Abdominal aortic calcification or “AAC” is a stable marker of CVD that can be semi-quantified using images for vertebral fracture assessment. This session provides an overview of the methodology for scoring, pitfalls and tips for readers, as well as discussing the association between AAC with CVD and fractures and the potential for patient management. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Describe how abdominal aortic calcification is scored on images taken for vertebral fracture assessment
    2. Describe the association between abdominal aortic calcification, cardiovascular disease and fracture.
    3. Describe two ways abdominal aortic calcification may influence patient management or primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.


    Joshua Richard Lewis, PhD

    Associate Professor

    Edith Cowan University

    Associate Professor Joshua Lewis leads the disorders of mineralisation research group within the School of Medical and Health Sciences at Edith Cowan University and is an early-mid career epidemiologist and clinical trialist with 11 years post-doctoral experience. He is a National Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellow and his research focusses on the convergence between bone and vascular biology with a particular focus on vascular calcification. This research seeks to identify individuals with clinically unrecognised disease so that early nutritional and lifestyle intervention can be implemented to prevent the progression to heart attacks and strokes. He works with international research groups and is currently participating in large international efforts to identify factors associated with osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease and leads international efforts to understand the pathophysiology and clinical implications of abdominal aortic calcification using different modalities and in different clinical populations. This international collaboration aims to improve reliability, generalizability and validity of epidemiological findings for abdominal aortic calcification using images form bone density machines. His overarching research aims are to develop better ways to identify and prevent disease before the onset of clinical symptoms. His research has been published in leading international medical journals such as Nature, the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, Lancet Planetary Health, Nature Communications, the Journal of the American Heart Association, Nature Genetics, Archives of Internal Medicine and the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. His research regularly receives national and international media attention and has attracted more than $3 million in funding from national peer reviewed grants and scholarships.

    John T. Schousboe, MD, PhD

    Director, Park Nicollet Osteoporosis Center

    Research Investigator Park Nicollet Clinic and HealthPartners Institute, HealthPartners, Minneapolis, MN

    John Schousboe is a rheumatologist, health services researcher, and expert in the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis. He is the Director of the Osteoporosis Center at Park Nicollet Clinic, a subsidiary of HeatlhPartners. His research interests are in the areas of vertebral fracture epidemiology and assessment, abdominal aortic calcification, fracture risk assessment, health care costs attributable to fractures, and cost-effectiveness of diagnostic procedures for osteoporosis and fracture prevention interventions.

  • What's Gone Wrong with Osteoporosis?

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Fractures in older adults are often the precursor of disability, loss of independence, and premature death. Despite these consequences, treatment of osteoporosis after fracture is inadequate and declining. Clinicians and other healthcare professionals do not recognize all fractures in older adults as warranting a thoughtful evaluation and they are do not recognize that bone loss is not the entire problem but rather part of a syndrome leading to fracture. These providers do not know how to comprehensively evaluate a patient based on established guidelines in order to recognize fracture risk and its major adverse outcomes. As such, they do not know how to appropriately manage treatment of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies.

    Clinicians and other healthcare professionals must recognize areas of improvement when managing and treating an older patient with a fracture.  Rather than just “treating the bone,” clinicians must know how to manage osteoporosis as a dysmobility syndrome.  They must know how to utilize a syndrome‐based approach to treatment, mimicking what is currently used for “osteoporosis” today, i.e., exercise, measures to reduce falls risk, and nutritional optimization/repletion, complemented by use of medications to improve bone mass and strength in order to reduce future fracture risk and improve post-fracture care.

    A crisis in the treatment of osteoporosis exists.  Individuals who sustain fracture many times do not receive treatment to reduce future fracture risk.  This activity will focus on “what’s gone wrong,” including documentation that something is ‘wrong’, poor communication/interaction between osteoporosis providers and orthopedic surgeons, overemphasis on osteoporosis and BMD and not on fracture, emphasis on drug prescriptions, and the lack of consensus and simplicity in the treatment of osteoporosis.