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  • Includes a Live In-Person Event on 02/05/2022 at 10:00 AM (EST)

    The core elements of this course serve to increase the knowledge and competence of clinicians regarding bone densitometry and osteoporosis diagnosis, clinical evaluation, treatment and monitoring and to apply standard practices to assure quality performance and interpretation of bone densitometry studies.

    The core elements of this course serve to increase the knowledge and competence of clinicians regarding bone densitometry and osteoporosis diagnosis, clinical evaluation, treatment and monitoring and to apply standard practices to assure quality performance and interpretation of bone densitometry studies. The first day sets the standard to perform quality DXA interpretation, while the second day focuses on the clinical assessment, prevention, treatment and management/monitoring of osteoporosis and the essential role that high-quality DXA plays in treatment initiation decisions and monitoring of osteoporotic patients. 

    Prerequisite videos are included in the registration fees. 

  • Includes a Live In-Person Event on 02/05/2022 at 10:00 AM (EST)

    The core elements of this course serve to increase the knowledge and competence of clinicians regarding bone densitometry and osteoporosis diagnosis, clinical evaluation, treatment and monitoring and to apply standard practices to assure quality performance and interpretation of bone densitometry studies.

    The core elements of this course serve to increase the knowledge and competence of clinicians regarding bone densitometry and osteoporosis diagnosis, clinical evaluation, treatment and monitoring and to apply standard practices to assure quality performance and interpretation of bone densitometry studies. The first day sets the standard to perform quality DXA interpretation, while the second day focuses on the clinical assessment, prevention, treatment and management/monitoring of osteoporosis and the essential role that high-quality DXA plays in treatment initiation decisions and monitoring of osteoporotic patients. 

    Prerequisite videos are included in the registration fees. 

  • This online enduring educational format allows the learner to read the journal article and engage in the most up to date research related to DISH in the adult population. Learners have the ability to retrieve this current information at an immediate and appropriate time to implement into practice. The learner will be required to read the article and successfully pass the post test to earn credit.

    ISCD is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. ISCD designates this activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    This activity is to be approved by ASRT for 1 Category A continuing education credit. This activity can be used toward the RT Structured Education and CQR requirements for the ARRT.

    Target Audience: The content is designed for clinicians and health care providers with an interest in skeletal health assessment, including specialists, generalists and technologists working in family medicine, general and internal medicine, endocrinology, rheumatology, obstetrics/gynecology, radiology, nuclear medicine, pediatrics, physical and occupational therapy and research.

    After attending the course, participants should be better prepared to:

    1. Evaluate DISH in the adult population

    2. Identify patient factors in relation to the prevalence of DISH

    3. Understand necessary additional imaging required to diagnose DISH

    This online enduring educational format allows the learner to read the journal article and engage in the most up to date research related to DISH in the adult population. Learners have the ability to retrieve this current information at an immediate and appropriate time to implement into practice.

    The estimated time to complete this activity is 1 hour. To obtain credit, participants should read the article, answer the multiple-choice posttest questions, and complete the evaluation form online to receive a certificate upon successful completion. Adobe Reader is required to view this article, and can be downloaded at http://get.adobe.com/reader/.

    This CME activity was designed to change learners’ competence. The participant will become familiar with updated research so they may begin to utilize them in practice to ultimately improve patient outcomes.

    Faculty List & Disclosure: Harold Rosen, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: No relationships to disclose.

    Date of Release/Date of Expiration: October 15, 2021/November 1, 2022

    Hardware/software requirements: Requirements

    ISCD Contact Information: If you have questions about this CME activity, please contact ISCD at education@iscd.org

    ©Journal of Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • This presentation aims to identify the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging and introduce basic concepts and trends in AI for patient and imaging considerations in osteoporosis and fracture prevention to hopefully improve standardization and clinical effectiveness in clinical densitometry. Originally offered live as a live session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    This presentation aims to identify the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging and introduce basic concepts and trends in AI for patient and imaging considerations in osteoporosis and fracture prevention to hopefully improve standardization and clinical effectiveness in clinical densitometry. Originally offered live as a live session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Describe the use of artificial intelligence in medical imaging.
    2. Identify basic concepts and trends in artificial intelligence. 
    3. Recognize patient and imaging considerations of artificial intelligence related to osteoporosis and fracture prevention. 

    Craig St. George

    Director of Education

    ASRT

    Craig’s health care career began in 2000 at Mayo Clinic Florida as a technologist assistant in radiology. Craig graduated from the Mayo School of Health Sciences radiography program in 2003. After graduation he was hired immediately into the vascular interventional radiography department, where he worked until mid-2004, when he was offered a position as clinical instructor in radiography for the Mayo Clinic program. After a few years he accepted the technologist supervisor in vascular interventional radiography position. During his time as IR supervisor, 2008 to 2013, Craig completed his bachelor’s degree in Professional Development and Advanced Patient Care from Grand Canyon University, was a volunteer on the ASRT CI/VI curriculum workgroup, and developed a vascular interventional radiography internship in the Mayo Clinic IR department, which began accepting students in 2011.

    In 2013 Craig decided it was time to leave Mayo Clinic to gain some unfamiliar health care knowledge and experiences. He accepted the role of center operations manager for Fresenius Medical Care of North America, a dialysis provider who operated over 50 dialysis shunt management centers nationally. He began contract writing for the ASRT, coauthoring the Vascular Interventional Essentials series which eventually lead to a position as director of online education in April, 2014. Having an original plan of becoming a hospital administrator, Craig completed his master’s degree in Health Care Administration, again from Grand Canyon University, in the spring of 2016. He is now the director of education at ASRT, still responsible for the development of online education courses, but in addition, oversees the maintenance of ASRT’s curricula among various other “duties as assigned”.

  • First, introduce the use of low dose CT + QCT protocol for volumetric bone mineral density measurement and the application in opportunistic screening of osteoporosis, then present the major findings of the China Biobank QCT BMD results and discuss the ramification of our study to the diagnosis and screening of osteoporosis in China and around the world. Originally offered live as a live session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    First, introduce the use of low dose CT + QCT protocol for volumetric bone mineral density measurement and the application in opportunistic screening of osteoporosis, then present the major findings of the China Biobank QCT BMD results and discuss the ramification of our study to the diagnosis and screening of osteoporosis in China and around the world. Originally offered live as a live session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Describe the LDCT+QCT protocol, upon completion, participant will be able to understand the requirement and procedures of LDCT+QCT
    2. Demonstrate the major findings from the big Chinese population LDCT+QCT study, upon completion, participant will be able to know the difference of between QCT study with DXA study, and understand why the prevalence of osteoporosis is so different between these two measurements.
    3. Interpret our results and explain the significance of our study, upon completion, participant will be able to understand the reasons why QCT vBMD is different from DXA BMD, and what this study brought to our future strategy in the management of osteoporosis


    Xiaoguang Cheng

    Professor & chairman, Department of Radiology

    Beijing Jishuitan hospital, Beijing, China

    Dr Xiaoguang Cheng, MD, Ph D, professor of radiology, Chairman of the department, Beijing Jishuitan hospital, Peking University, Beijing, China. He obtained his master degree in radiology in 1990 from the Beijing institute of trauma and orthopaedic, followed by a Ph D in radiology from the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium in 1997. During 1997-2001, he was trained in the radiology department of UCSF, USA as post doc fellow under the mentor of professor Harry Genant. He returned to China in 2001 and is working the radiology department of Beijing Jishuitan hospital ever since. He became the Chairman of the department in 2006 and professor in 2007 till to now.
    Dr Xiaoguang Cheng is considered one of the most experienced MSK radiologists in China, in particular in the bone tumor imaging and osteoporosis. He focused his research in the field of osteoporosis for many years, and was one of leading experts in the bone mineral density assessment field. In recently years, he studied the application of QCT in China, in particular, the application of LDCT+QCT in the health check program in China.

  • This lecture will discuss interesting and challenging DXA scans. Included in the presentation are problems with DXA scan analysis and challenging cases including how objects in the soft tissue affect analysis and how to do an analysis with spinal hardware present. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    This lecture will discuss interesting and challenging DXA scans. Included in the presentation are problems with DXA scan analysis and challenging cases including how objects in the soft tissue affect analysis and how to do an analysis with spinal hardware present. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting..

    Learning Objectives

    1. Identify common technical and reporting errors from scans acquired on GE Lunar instruments.
    2. Describe challenging DXA situations identified by colleagues. 
    3. List approaches to assess the technical validity of GE Lunar DXA scans. 


    Sarah L. Morgan, MD, RD, CCD

    Professor, Medical Director UAB Osteoporosis Clinic and DXA Facility

    University of Alabama at Birmingham

    Dr. Morgan is the Medical Director of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Osteoporosis Prevention and Treatment Clinic and the UAB Bone Densitometry (DXA) Service. The UAB DXA service is accredited by the International Society for Clinical Densitometry. She received degrees in Food and Nutrition and Dietetics and Food and Nutrition and Related Sciences at Iowa State University and completed medical school and an internal medicine internship and residency at the University of Iowa. She completed a Clinical Nutrition fellowship and a master’s degree in Clinical Nutrition at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She currently is a Professor of Medicine and Nutrition Sciences in the Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology. Dr. Morgan’s research interests are in the areas of folate and methotrexate metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis and bone densitometry and she participates in osteoporosis and DXA clinical trials in the UAB Osteoporosis Clinic. Dr. Morgan is s past President of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry and a past chair of the ISCD Education Council.

  • Rheumatic diseases have the greatest impact on the musculoskeletal system and osteoporosis is a common and significant co-morbidity. In this talk I will briefly review skeletal manifestations of rheumatic diseases, with a special emphasis on osteoporosis and its prevention and management in patients with rheumatic diseases. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Rheumatic diseases have the greatest impact on the musculoskeletal system and osteoporosis is a common and significant co-morbidity. In this talk I will briefly review skeletal manifestations of rheumatic diseases, with a special emphasis on osteoporosis and its prevention and management in patients with rheumatic diseases.. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Review skeletal manifestations of rheumatic diseases
    2. Review the epidemiology of osteoporosis in people with rheumatic diseases
    3. Review the prevention and management of osteoporosis in partients with rheumatic disease


    John J. Carey, MBBChBAO, MS

    Consultant Physician in Rheumatology and Personal Professor in Medicine

    Galway University Hospitals, Galway

  • This didactic lecture will walk through steps to develop a research project and design novel approaches to DXA acquisition. This will include discussion regarding available technology and evaluation of various options to evaluate skeletal status.. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    This didactic lecture will walk through steps to develop a research project and design novel approaches to DXA acquisition. This will include discussion regarding available technology and evaluation of various options to evaluate skeletal status.. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Describe steps to structure a framework for research design.
    2. Compare and contrast various approaches to skeletal assessment.
    3. Understand the basic technical components of DXA that will impact non-standard acquisition methods.


    Diane Krueger, BS, CBDT

    Program Manager Osteoporosis Clinical

    UW Osteoporosis Clinic

    Diane Krueger received her Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is an ISCD-certified clinical densitometrist and a certified clinical research coordinator through the Association of Clinical Research Professionals. She has been program manager of the University of Wisconsin Osteoporosis Clinical Research Program since its inception in 1993. Ms. Krueger has extensive clinical research experience in osteoporosis and bone densitometry, having coordinated multiple industry and investigator-initiated studies. In collaboration with the UW Osteoporosis Program, she has published over 90 manuscripts and authored or presented over 200 abstracts. Her service with ISCD has included serving as Technologist Bone Densitometry Course faculty since 2006 and chairing the related Update Annual Meeting Committees. In her leadership capacity, she is currently Education Council chair and serves on the Executive Committee and Board. Additionally, she previously held several officer positions including Secretary and four Presidential seats.

  • Hundreds of genes have been identified in genome wide association studies of bone traits, but their total contribution to variation of these traits is small. This session will address the reasons why this is so. It will also inform listeners about the differences between human and model organism genetics and illustrate how genetic effects are measured. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Hundreds of genes have been identified in genome wide association studies of bone traits, but their total contribution to variation of these traits is small. This session will address the reasons why this is so. It will also inform listeners about the differences between human and model organism genetics and illustrate how genetic effects are measured. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Understand the basic concepts underlying GWAS.
    2. Appreciate the multiple bone properties assessed by biomechanical testing.
    3. Understand the importance of trait selection to genetic study design.


    Robert D. Blank, MD, PhD

    Visiting Scientist

    The Garvan Institute of Medical Research

    Robert D Blank is Professor of Medicine Emeritus at the Medical College of Wisconsin and a visiting scientist at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, Australia. He is a past president of the ISCD, a fellow of the ACP and the ASBMR, and a member of the ANZBMS, ASHG, Endocrine Society, GSA, APS, and AHA. He serves on the IOF's Council of Scientific Advisors, the boards of directors of the International Federation of Musculoskeletal Research Societies and the Asia-Pacific Fragility Fracture Alliance. He is an associate editor of Bone and a member of the editorial boards of JBMR, Osteoporosis International, Endocrinology, Translational Research, and Clinical Reviews in Bone and Mineral Metabolism.

    Dr. Blank is a physician-scientist with a laboratory research program focused on the genetic basis of bone biomechanical performance. Other research interests include the genetics of congenital vertebral malformation, best DXA practices, undertreatment of osteoporosis, and osteosclerotic disorders. He is an author of over 100 publications and has held multiple federal research grants. He served as associate director of the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Wisconsin from 2006-2013.

    Dr. Blank received undergraduate degrees from Columbia University and the University of Cambridge and his MD and PhD degrees from New York University. He completed residency at Weill-Cornell in internal medicine and did his fellowship in endocrinology in the combined Weill-Cornell and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center program. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Rockefeller University concurrently with fellowship. He began his faculty career at the Hospital for Special Surgery and Weill-Cornell College of Medicine. He moved to the University of Wisconsin in 2000 and to the Medical College of Wisconsin in 2013, retiring in 2019 on moving to Australia.

  • Patients, doctors, and government officials routinely underestimate the impact of musculoskeletal (MSK) disease. Proper framing of the true burden of disease may improve awareness and management. A MSK failure scale is proposed. Its potential benefits, the work needed to establish it, and potential barriers to implementation are summarized. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Patients, doctors, and government officials routinely underestimate the impact of musculoskeletal (MSK) disease. Proper framing of the true burden of disease may improve awareness and management. A MSK failure scale is proposed. Its potential benefits, the work needed to establish it, and potential barriers to implementation are summarized. Originally offered live as an On Demand session at the 2021 Virtual Annual meeting.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Appreciate the global burden of musculoskeletal disorders.
    2. Recognize the treatment gap for osteoporotic fractures.
    3. Understand how a validated functional musculoskeletal failure scale would add value to research studies and improve awareness of its impact.


    Robert D. Blank, MD, PhD

    Visiting Scientist

    The Garvan Institute of Medical Research

    Robert D Blank is Professor of Medicine Emeritus at the Medical College of Wisconsin and a visiting scientist at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, Australia. He is a past president of the ISCD, a fellow of the ACP and the ASBMR, and a member of the ANZBMS, ASHG, Endocrine Society, GSA, APS, and AHA. He serves on the IOF's Council of Scientific Advisors, the boards of directors of the International Federation of Musculoskeletal Research Societies and the Asia-Pacific Fragility Fracture Alliance. He is an associate editor of Bone and a member of the editorial boards of JBMR, Osteoporosis International, Endocrinology, Translational Research, and Clinical Reviews in Bone and Mineral Metabolism.

    Dr. Blank is a physician-scientist with a laboratory research program focused on the genetic basis of bone biomechanical performance. Other research interests include the genetics of congenital vertebral malformation, best DXA practices, undertreatment of osteoporosis, and osteosclerotic disorders. He is an author of over 100 publications and has held multiple federal research grants. He served as associate director of the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Wisconsin from 2006-2013.

    Dr. Blank received undergraduate degrees from Columbia University and the University of Cambridge and his MD and PhD degrees from New York University. He completed residency at Weill-Cornell in internal medicine and did his fellowship in endocrinology in the combined Weill-Cornell and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center program. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Rockefeller University concurrently with fellowship. He began his faculty career at the Hospital for Special Surgery and Weill-Cornell College of Medicine. He moved to the University of Wisconsin in 2000 and to the Medical College of Wisconsin in 2013, retiring in 2019 on moving to Australia.